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 Post subject: bikes
PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 1:27 pm 
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i guess lucas will be able to give me some answers here...

i want to buy a bike to ride to work a couple of days a week and for the occasional weekend outing.

nothing too serious but something reliable and decent quality.

what should i go for? are there certain brands that i should look out for etc?

which shops should i go too or should i look at second hand?

help me out!


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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 1:29 pm 
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some dirt cheap bikes availble from the cash converters in Footscray !
they look brand new !

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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 1:36 pm 
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I'd say go low grade mountain bike. (but I am biased :))

the shop to go for would depend on which side of town you live. if you're on the N/NE side, go for Brunswick Street Cycles.

you should be able to get a Norco/Avanti for under $500.00.

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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 1:36 pm 
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T I C K A wrote:
some dirt cheap bikes availble from the cash converters in Footscray !
they look brand new !


One man's loss is another man's gain hey?

Hey Friday - it depends how much you're willing to spend on a bike. You can get a decent bike for like $200 made up of random parts the bike shop owners get in cheap. If you want more quality components though, you gotta spend more. I reckon $500 is a reasonable amount to spend on an "occasional" bike but that's just me.


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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 1:38 pm 
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system wrote:
if you're on the N/NE side, go for Brunswick Street Cycles.

you should be able to get a Norco/Avanti for under $500.00.


Word. They good.


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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 1:40 pm 
I ride a mountain bike to work everyday. Its not very ideal for long rides. If you have to ride some distance I would go for a hybrid bike. Has the speed and lightness of a racer and has the strength of a mountain bike.


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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 1:48 pm 
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beatski wrote:
I ride a mountain bike to work everyday. Its not very ideal for long rides. If you have to ride some distance I would go for a hybrid bike. Has the speed and lightness of a racer and has the strength of a mountain bike.

riding comfort all depends on your seat-to-bars-tocranks height ratios mate. having a comfy seat helps too.

hybrids can be a bit fiddly (bigger wheel size), but can be lighter in frame weight compared to the average MTB.

I rode to work on my MTB almost every day for about 6 years. still do now in Sydney - just not every working day. no comfort problems, but I got a very light frame and have replaced quite a few of the components.

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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 1:56 pm 
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If you can afford it I would buy a brand new bike. Most bike shops will give you a year of free service, which will definitely come in handy.

In your area, I hear good things about Freedom Machine on Chapel St, although I think they've just moved to a smaller place on Chapel St so they could open a bigger one somewhere else.

Brands to look out for. Kona, Giant, Avanti, Specialised, Canondale, Trek.

If you're going to be riding only on roads and bike paths you will probably be recommended a 'hybrid' bike. They usually have thinner tyres than mountain bikes and are a bit lighter (most of the time). Mountain bikes are a bit sturdier than hybrids, have fatter tyres (which makes them a bit safer in my opinion - especially around tram tracks), and most people like the look of them better than hybrids. A mountain bike will also give you the option of riding on off-road terrain if you're feeling so inclined.

Test ride a few bikes and don't let anyone pressure you into making a decision. The bike needs to be comfy otherwise you'll be reluctant to ride it. Also if the seat is not comfortable ask them to switch it over. Everyone's bum is shaped a bit differently and there's a wide variety of seats to choose from.

2nd hand is cheaper, but can be a gamble. Some bike shops stock 2nd hand bikes which might be worth looking at, because you'll know they've been serviced and are roadworthy. Alternatively your boy might be a good judge as to whether or not a 2nd hand bike is any good (I remember something about him being into bikes?)

Definitely get the best helmet you can afford, and don't forget to factor in lights and a lock into your costs.

Also. I usually tell people to spend at least 10% of the cost of their bike on their lock. $400 bike - $40 plus lock. $1000 bike - $100 plus lock.

Enjoy. =)


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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 2:44 pm 
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My boy and I got pushies when we moved to Carlton North because the ride back to Fitzroy for outings beats walking! We have GT Timberlines which are hybrids. I had a Timberline for my first mountbike but they were't hybrids then as they have evolved to be now.

My current one has grip shifts which arent cool if you're a biking nut but I wasnt so into it as to pay the extra $ for rapid fire thumb & finger shifters. The grips work so why change them!

We bought end of season models at the Brunswick St bike shop, thus saving a few bucks just because it is a different colour to the next year's model. Make sure you bargain for a good price including all the extras you will need like helmet, front and rear light, water bottle cage, water bottle, lock and if you want more..... speedometer (love mine!), toe clips if you want them, bicycle clips so your pants don't go in the chain, reflector vest if you want to be extra safe, and gloves. One thing to consider with lights is that they dont need special batteries and they wont be too heavy in your bag when you take all them off (leave it on & it'll get pinched).

Lastly consider changing the wheel and seat from quick release if you dont think you'll regularly be taking your bike out in your car. It doesnt cost too much to do and gives you extra peace of mind for when you dont park your bike within eyesight. At Uni I had my front wheel stolen which was a complete drag, friends have had seats stolen, and avoid cable locks as thieves can cut through those as havppened to me in broad daylight at Uni. Even though they might be a good brand and looked thick to me it took the guy 2 seconds with a bolt cutter. Go for a U-lock I reckon, though they get sawn through by the determined thieves!

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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 2:51 pm 
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lucas wrote:
Definitely get the best helmet you can afford, and don't forget to factor in lights and a lock into your costs.

Also. I usually tell people to spend at least 10% of the cost of their bike on their lock. $400 bike - $40 plus lock. $1000 bike - $100 plus lock.

Enjoy. =)

well said. :smt023

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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 2:54 pm 
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nice one ms lucie!
ive been pushing a bike around everyday for the past 4 months with work
just finished a ride around magnetic island

i wouldnt mind buyin a new mountain bike next year, would like to try some rugged downhill riding


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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 3:19 pm 
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Mongoose Soultioun BMX............

I still have mine from high school. Im such a BMX bandit....Biggup Nicole Kidman :lol:

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EDIT - Sorry Lucie im not helping.


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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 3:20 pm 
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Snippet of an email I sent to my work mates a couple of weeks ago:

Business cost-benefits of cycling to work include:

* Increased work productivity as a result of improved fitness and metal health.
* Staff who cycle are (reported to be) more punctual, and take less sick days.
* Work absenteeism can be reduced 14% - 80% by encouraging cycling to work.
* Businesses receive a $1.33 - $6.50 return on each $1 spent on cycling promotion due to increased productivity.

Personal cost-benefits include

* Save well over $1,000 per year in public transport tickets (45 weeks x $25.90 [10 x 2hour ticket]).
* NRMA estimates that the cost of running a car for most people varies from $5,652 - $16,314 per year. You can buy and maintain a kick-ass bike for much less than this.

I found all these wonderful facts and lots more at:

http://www.abc.dotars.gov.au/benefits_of_cycling.htm


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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 3:33 pm 
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wow - just got back to my desk...

heaps of info there!

thanks everyone!

good info to get me started on the right track ;)

:D 8) :D :D


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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 4:01 pm 
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lucas wrote:
Snippet of an email I sent to my work mates a couple of weeks ago:

Business cost-benefits of cycling to work include:

* Increased work productivity as a result of improved fitness and metal health.
* Staff who cycle are (reported to be) more punctual, and take less sick days.
* Work absenteeism can be reduced 14% - 80% by encouraging cycling to work.
* Businesses receive a $1.33 - $6.50 return on each $1 spent on cycling promotion due to increased productivity.

Personal cost-benefits include

* Save well over $1,000 per year in public transport tickets (45 weeks x $25.90 [10 x 2hour ticket]).
* NRMA estimates that the cost of running a car for most people varies from $5,652 - $16,314 per year. You can buy and maintain a kick-ass bike for much less than this.

I found all these wonderful facts and lots more at:

http://www.abc.dotars.gov.au/benefits_of_cycling.htm

just went to have a look. the URI has moved to:
http://www.abc.dotars.gov.au/Publicatio ... cling.aspx

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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 4:17 pm 
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A lightweight alloy frame, short stem, riser bars and some semi slicks make for a pretty versatile upright position city bike.

Wouldnt bother with disc brakes unless you are splashing out more $$ simple v brakes are durable, easy to adjust and cheap, comfy seat (not fat and foamy) firm with some give, you might find a cutaway seat good too if you are going to be on it a fair bit, relieves pressure in special areas....

some wide bmx style pedals are nice and grippy but will rip up your shins when you come off. clipless are choice but teh shoes aint cheap...

get a decent helmet, it will be light firm and you will feel safer!

Id avoid hybrid bikes, they are the worst of both worlds. A well set up mountainbike would do you twice as well. I think you get what you pay for when it comes too bikes.

bit of a ramble eh? :)


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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 4:29 pm 
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March 10, 2005 Mercedes-Benz is launching a new push bike model with an 8-speed automatic gearshift system – a high-technology pushbike with an emphasis on elegance, safety and exceptional comfort. Through its electronically controlled air suspension, a new type of 8-speed automatic gearshift system and its sensor-controlled lights, the bike adapts automatically to prevailing conditions, delivering an enjoyable riding experience under all circumstances – just as you would expect from other Mercedes product. The central on-board computer, controlled by the “flight deck” on the front section of the handlebars lies at the heart of the “Cyber Nexus” technology.

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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 4:33 pm 
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nic wrote:
Id avoid hybrid bikes, they are the worst of both worlds. A well set up mountainbike would do you twice as well. I think you get what you pay for when it comes too bikes.


different strokes for different folks.

my first bike was a racer and i found i often had a sore back if i rode it properly bending over. my next bike was an MB but it was so annoying to run out of gears when riding down some of the farken big hills in Brisbane. The hybrid works for me with wide slicks fitted, bar ends, comfy seat and good riding position. :D

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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 4:36 pm 
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true!
if you are are only hittting the bitumen would be tre fine.


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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 5:06 pm 
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Polecat wrote:
different strokes for different folks.

Exactly.

If it were up to me everyone would be riding fixed-gear track bikes with no brakes. =)


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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 5:07 pm 
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:lol:

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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 8:26 pm 
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... and since the bike fans are hanging in this thread, here's something of interest coming up at Cinema Nova!

Hell on Wheels (PG)

EXCLUSIVE! Starts May 19

Terrific documentary about the Tour de France

Now over 100 years old, Le Tour de France, is the toughest bicycle race of them all and year after year, this spectacular and nail-biting event fascinates millions around the world.

Academy Award winning German filmmaker Pepe Danquart brings the beauty of the French landscape together with the suspense of the race. This terrific documentary offers not only a fascinating insight into the Tour itself but also brings the viewer up close and personal with the individuals on the bikes; their pain, torture and fear, the tears of those who are out of the race, and the joy of those who have suffered, but fulfilled their biggest dream - to reach the finishing line of the world's toughest race.

(German language with English subtitles)

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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2005 9:59 pm 
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I recall a certain store having a 50% OFF sale on all its bikes a while ago. Not sure if one is due again but ill look into it.

I picked the older model of this in the last sale......


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PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2005 9:30 am 
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PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2005 1:33 pm 
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PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2005 5:38 pm 
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i agree with the $500 mark, i'd prolly go so far to say $700.
you really notice the difference and if you're riding fairly often you notice it more
my recommendation is high pressure slicks. i've got 100psi ones for my MTB and they're great. makes riding so much easier. bar ends also rock. i've also got some really bright halogen lights. they're kinda dorky but i'm not a fan of being run over.

giving thought to getting a racer/hybrid.

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PostPosted: Fri May 13, 2005 9:11 pm 
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what about this one?

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PostPosted: Mon May 16, 2005 1:04 am 
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personally i prefer a greater difference between the wheel sizes. and that seat looks to comfy for me

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2005 1:37 am 
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ok guys,

i'm after a bike for future rides to work (into the city). will be moving up north shortly and can't be stuffed with PT. I'd of course be riding everyday to and fro.

can anyone recommend a brand, type, model, place to look for my needs? also maybe any info on bags that are good for riding and/or helmets? my budget is ~$1100-1500

I am:
6'5", over 110kg, used to ride heaps previously (circa 1997) but want to get back into it. need possibly a hybrid, but leaning towards a road bike. also would like a strong bike, I have very powerful legs and stride and have managed to snap a couple pedals in my time.

I'd be interested to know how technology has gained in areas of quality and construction build, and if it's still viable to buy tire patches in case of flats etc... ;)

on that note has tire technology actually improved to minimise punctures? any restrictive problems i could potentially cause given my stats? I want to be able to maintain my bike.

any advice on what's a good measure of items you take in your typical ride, if any trek it to work. i'd like to compare what I take now to work, and what I would be taking with a bike etc.

some things of note, I sweat heaps and have no shower at work, so i'd probably have to take baby wipes to clean myself up before the working day. does anyone here tackle varied things like this, and what do you do about it?

also is ebay a good option once i know what I want? I forgot what frame size bike i need. so hopefully my height is a good measure :)


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2005 1:48 am 
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these things are the business

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2005 2:24 am 
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Isn't that out the front of loco on brunny st?


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2005 9:21 am 
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deviant wrote:
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these things are the business



choppaderos stylee, anyone seen them all congregate at luna park on Sunday mornings? fark me there is some hawt bikes there


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2005 10:11 am 
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those are the business aye?? arnt loco lowriders going out of business?


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2005 11:09 am 
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GT or stfu

Have had three GT's. An avalanche which was great (although some chainsuck problems). A GT RTS which was great. I eventually snapped the frame (after three seasons of gravity racing) and GT replaced the frame no questions asked. Currently have an LTS which has been going strong for a number of years. Busted the swingarm but they replaced it with a CNC swingarm from the Boomerang model that Ronning and Sharples used to use at NORBA and World Cups back in the day. Cool bike. Squats through corners, no stinkbug, pretty solid laterally as well. Lots of fun

Propose MBC bike day. We all turn up on low riders wearing white singlets and hairnets, with hip hop blasting out of an ole ghetto blaster, and lookin ard as fuck.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2005 11:18 am 
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re: Loco: Unfortunately I think they are. Either way, don't get a chopper or lowrider- they look special but they are shithouse to ride everyday.


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2005 11:20 am 
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i had a GT Yukon for a while which was my bro's, was mad.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2005 11:26 am 
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Rob M wrote:
can anyone recommend a brand, type, model, place to look for my needs? also maybe any info on bags that are good for riding and/or helmets? my budget is ~$1100-1500


You'll get something quite decent for this amount of money. You definitely get what you pay for, at this price range any brand/model will be pretty good.

The most important thing is to do lots (and lots) of test rides. Especially if you're trying to decide between hybrid or road bike. If I had to choose between the two I would choose a road bike but that's just personal preference. It really depends on what distances you'll be riding and over what terrain.

I would recommend buying from somewhere that will give you 12 months of free after-sales service. Although, if you're moving this might not apply.

Chrome, Timbuktu, or Crumpler are good if you're after the bike-messenger style of bag. Otherwise, most bike shops stock a nice selection of backpacks.

Rob M wrote:
I am:
6'5", over 110kg, used to ride heaps previously (circa 1997) but want to get back into it. need possibly a hybrid, but leaning towards a road bike. also would like a strong bike, I have very powerful legs and stride and have managed to snap a couple pedals in my time.


As above, most bikes in your price range will be pretty well built. Should definitely not have any problems with components snapping. A strong set of wheels is probably the most important thing. Some road bikes are sold with 16/18 spoke wheels which are very light and fast, but you'd probably want 32/36 spokes for lots of commuting. Heaps stronger and less likely to buckle.

Rob M wrote:
I'd be interested to know how technology has gained in areas of quality and construction build, and if it's still viable to buy tire patches in case of flats etc... ;)


Tyre patches are still fine. If you're paranoid like me you can just carry a spare tube.

Rob M wrote:
on that note has tire technology actually improved to minimise punctures? any restrictive problems i could potentially cause given my stats? I want to be able to maintain my bike.


I always buy Continental tyres. Raced and trained on them all my life. Some of their tyres have a puncture resistant layer in them. I started using these about 3 years ago. No punctures as of yet.

Rob M wrote:
any advice on what's a good measure of items you take in your typical ride, if any trek it to work. i'd like to compare what I take now to work, and what I would be taking with a bike etc.


I use a very large Chrome commuter bag with me. The list of items I take with me goes like this...

Toolkit
Tube
Pump
Organiser
iPod
Keys
Phone
Wallet
Jacket (for rain)
Gloves
Beanie
Camera

Rob M wrote:
some things of note, I sweat heaps and have no shower at work, so i'd probably have to take baby wipes to clean myself up before the working day. does anyone here tackle varied things like this, and what do you do about it?

Some backpacks have a layer of netting that kind've holds the backpack away from your back a bit. I've been told that these are great for staying cool in summer but I haven't tried them myself. Make sure your helmet has lots of vents too.

No shower at my work but when it's really hot I usually have a t-shirt that I can change into.

Rob M wrote:
also is ebay a good option once i know what I want? I forgot what frame size bike i need. so hopefully my height is a good measure :)

I would avoid eBay. For various reasons. Good for parts, but I'd never buy a complete bike via eBay. At your height you will probably want a frame around the 58-59cm mark.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2005 11:38 am 
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kevlar reinforced tires seem to do the trick. I've got some high pressure slicks and i've only had one puncture in the past couple of years.

If you sweat lots, ride slower and/or take a change of clothes.

get a spedo that measures how fast you pedal. 90RPM is supposed to be the most efficient.

If you ever ride at night get some crazy fuck off lights. These will probably set you back ~$200 but they're well worth it. Those little flashing LED ones do fuck all.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2005 3:42 pm 
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how much of the pedeling energy you generate do you lose to suspension in mountain bikes?

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flippo wrote:
how much of the pedeling energy you generate do you lose to suspension in mountain bikes?

Couldn't give you a percentage off the top of my head. I'm sure someone would know though.

I swapped my suspension forks for rigid ones on my last mountain bike though because I hated them so much.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2005 3:59 pm 
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this is my ride. the ol' KHS Wedgewood. That's a suave name for a bike. Forget your GTRs and Avalanche and names like that. U want a bike that goes by the name... "Wedgewood".

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2005 6:22 pm 
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flippo wrote:
how much of the pedeling energy you generate do you lose to suspension in mountain bikes?


I've got a hardtail MTB so i can pull a trailer. afaik, the energy only really gets lost in the rear suspension. My front suspension is set fairly stiff but it still takes out the little bumps and vibrations and makes it that much easier on your wrists.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2005 6:30 pm 
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lucas wrote:
Rob M wrote:
some things of note, I sweat heaps and have no shower at work, so i'd probably have to take baby wipes to clean myself up before the working day. does anyone here tackle varied things like this, and what do you do about it?

Some backpacks have a layer of netting that kind've holds the backpack away from your back a bit. I've been told that these are great for staying cool in summer but I haven't tried them myself. Make sure your helmet has lots of vents too.

Deuter make a series of bags along these lines. highly recommended (I have two in the series).

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2005 10:04 pm 
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lucas wrote:
flippo wrote:
how much of the pedeling energy you generate do you lose to suspension in mountain bikes?

Couldn't give you a percentage off the top of my head. I'm sure someone would know though.

I swapped my suspension forks for rigid ones on my last mountain bike though because I hated them so much.


what did you hate about them?

Basiacaly I want an idea of how much of a cunt it is to ride a mountain bike along the road and/or how much more difficult it is to go offroad (without doing xtreme shit) with a hybrid. My oldschool mountain bike did not hav e any suspension whatsover, I used to ride it off-road and it got punished heaps and died. It was a malvern star.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2005 10:10 pm 
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suspension on your front forks won't really affect the amount of torque. so long as you keep them pretty tight, it's all good.

I don't recommend getting a hybrid at all (I hate those giant wheels).

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2005 10:24 pm 
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flippo wrote:
lucas wrote:
flippo wrote:
how much of the pedeling energy you generate do you lose to suspension in mountain bikes?

Couldn't give you a percentage off the top of my head. I'm sure someone would know though.

I swapped my suspension forks for rigid ones on my last mountain bike though because I hated them so much.


what did you hate about them?

Basiacaly I want an idea of how much of a cunt it is to ride a mountain bike along the road and/or how much more difficult it is to go offroad (without doing xtreme shit) with a hybrid. My oldschool mountain bike did not hav e any suspension whatsover, I used to ride it off-road and it got punished heaps and died. It was a malvern star.

I've spent many years riding road and track bikes. Just couldn't get used to suspension. Disliked the way it handled and disliked the amount of energy it seemed to absorb.

To be specific I ended up replacing the forks on it with a pair of suspension forks that you could completely lock out. They had a lever you could turn to switch back to suspension mode but I never used it. Forks like these may be ideal for you if you ride on the road mostly but plan on hitting some trails every now and again?

In the end I sold that bike to a guy from work. Happy with my track bike (when I get it back from the mechanic eventually).

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2005 10:28 pm 
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hey I like the idea of that, being able to lock the suspension. Think that answered my question. Just gotta find out of any bikes come with that stock, don't want to have to spend much after market dollars.

Cheers guys!

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2005 10:39 pm 
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flippo wrote:
hey I like the idea of that, being able to lock the suspension. Think that answered my question. Just gotta find out of any bikes come with that stock, don't want to have to spend much after market dollars.

most good forks do let you lock them down. look out for brands like Rock Shox and Marzocchi (:love3:).

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2005 11:18 pm 
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thanks very much lucas for the extensive outline :) and thanks to system for the bag ideas. every bit of info will help me greatly. cheers lads.

i'm really happy about the prospect of getting a new bike. After owning a car for a bit, and considering the money pit that was, I think investing time and energy into pedal power gives you a greater sense of gratification. Makes it easier living closer to the city too.

I think it's in my blood considering my grandad used to race!

I used to ride 18km's daily when I was going to high school, and if I was to ride from my current house to work it'd be probably 55km's per day; which would kill me literally ;)

My ideal holiday would be riding around Europe: Forest Gump style, but not running :)


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2005 11:40 pm 
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if you get 80mm travel front suss, youll be fine pedalling, just set em up stiff no probs!!! or get some fox forx with lock out


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